The European Panorama of Traditional Music Heritage CD-ROM is available at the CD-Rom link.

[To access the recordings go to 'list of music & video' on the index at the top right corner of the home link]

As a suite of international projects implemented through transnational co-operation, the European Commission and the Council of Europe set up a joint project on the heritage of traditional music in Europe. The enlarged meaning of the heritage concept for current society made countries interested in deciphering in European terms what intellectual, spiritual and ethical values mean in the light of European heritage. Some aspects and subjects that had so far been given less attention by research or by national or international protection became the subject of transnational discussion. One, traditional music, was selected by both institutions as a living heritage, as a challenge, as one of the more interesting and pertinent exercises of reflection. Its special tangible and intangible heritage asset constitutes an essential element of mutual cultural belonging, as this CD-ROM reveals.

This production is a "pioneer laboratory" of conceptualisation of the richness of the diversity of traditional music, the wealth in current urban and rural European societies - whether defined nationally or regionally or coming from cultural minorities - as well as an attempt to express clearly the links and relations that permit cultural communities, performers and those who simply enjoy the music to realize the immensity of the common roots and common meanings of sounds, dances and rhythms. Traditional musical heritage is a privileged context for discovering the importance of music in each of the important moments for each European cultural community.

The aim of this production is to increase our understanding of this heritage as well as to elucidate the European connections throughout history, in a constant flux until our own days. As a transgenerational exercise, traditional music moments show how creativity is guaranteed in each performance, confirming the maintenance of what is essential. The traditional knowledge contains the beliefs, the expectations, the customs and the cognitive categories, which, in musical expression find some of the richest connections with traditional wisdom.

The European traditional cultural groups tend to be overlooked in the reflection on traditional ways of living. However, Europe needs to approach this heritage to enhance and to protect the expression conveyed by it. Traditional music, generally considered more as an issue of developing countries in other continents and far from European industrialized societies, appears vast and wealthy in Europe. It was surprising to see the number of music festivals that were arranged as national or transfrontier initiatives during the Campaign, as a very successful way of transmitting the message of the Campaign: enjoy together the living heritage traditions.

This project on traditional music has approached privileged traditional moments (even in the centre of a big city), breaking down isolation to arrive at a common understanding by Europeans. Special and unique recordings, conscientious selection of archive material, and the exercise of common interpretation of the data, confer the CD-Rom with special contents: the pondered selection of authentic performances, the threat to some of the traditions, the sense of the one-and-only moment.

Traditional music, as a multicultural place for mutual understanding, shapes a sentimental heritage belonging to all of us, touching the most significant details of everyday life. An on-going mutual re-vitalizing will to give life to these manifestations reflects the interest of transcending any kind of particularism. This modest contribution wants to stimulate the conscience of Europeans for a better future for this living heritage.

Council of Europe (2002) ‘Moments of Traditional Music in Europe’, a Joint Action - Campaign Title: ‘Europe A Common Heritage’. [CD-ROM] Council of Europe Directorate of Communication & Research – Publishing Division & European Commission.

For a full list of recordings collected as part of the moments de musique traditionnelle en Europe_CDRom, see below.

For further information on the “Europe, a common heritage” - a Council of Europe campaign, see below.

 

 

          

EUROPEAN COMMISSION                   COUNCIL OF EUROPE               Development - Production
 

 

"A common cultural heritage enriched by its diversity" was proposed in the Final Declaration of the Council of Europe's First Summit Meeting in Vienna in 1993. Subsequently, at the Second Summit Meeting of the Council of Europe 1997, Heads of States and Governments have declared: "The projection and promotion of the cultural and natural heritage of Europe is considered to be an important priority," and in defining the fundamental values of democracy and cultural diversity, to highlight the common values of Europe as: citizenship education within democratic system, the exposition and protection of Europe's common heritage and new information technologies

The Campaign’s organisational outline and methods were endorsed by the Foreign Affairs Ministers in Budapest,1999, while the 47 Contracting Parties to the European Cultural Convention, observer States, as well as governmental and non-governmental international organisations active in the field of cultural heritage have been involved in the campaign. In addition, primary international organisations gave an unconditional support to this Council of Europe Campaign: the European Commission, UNESCO, Europa Nostra, ICOMOS, ICOM. A joint Council of Europe/European Commission Campaign Programme included five activities: European Heritage Days; an international photographic competition and three transnational projects: - the ancient universities route, - the decorative arts workshops, - the European traditional musical heritage.

One of the key objectives of the Campaign was to realise a common experience as Europeans, not simply based on common interests but in the need to create a common framework of reflection. The Campaign has served to rethink the objectives and benefits of the European cultural heritage and through it, to define the Europe of today’s Europeans, as their own point of reference, redefining values, commitments and practice, taking account of the fact that the ways of imagining Europe are no longer defined solely by institutional public authorities.

Europe has come to be understood as a form of citizenship and its heritage - as a platform for discovering renewed and necessary forms of sociability between citizens, professionals and governments.

Heritage was conceived as an arena of multiple references and the Campaign explored the extent to which these were shared. In addition, an attempt was made to assess the forms of appropriation going beyond the ties of faith or culture as defined on its own terms. Conversely the question was posed as to how the foreign be defined in what is one’s own, and how can one’s own be found in what is foreign?

The author would like to acknowledge the material source for the Council of Europe Campaign has been paraphrased and summarised from the following publication and has influenced the way in which the author arranged the document.

Committee of Ministers Doc. 9025 (2001). “Europe, a common heritage” - a Council of Europe campaign Recommendation 1465 (2000) [Online] Available <http://assembly.coe.int/ASP/Doc/XrefViewHTML.asp?FileID=9250&Language=EN> Accessed [17 Oct 2014]


 International events

15-16 April 1999 – Berlin (Germany): European conference on "Heritage conservation and employment", organised by the German National Committee for Heritage Protection, bringing together representatives of the European institutions, authorities, conservation services and specialised firms as well as organisations for the reintegration of the unemployed and volunteers.

22-24 April 1999 – Brussels (Belgium): colloquy on “European Heritage Days: the secret of their success and challenges for the future”, jointly organised in the framework of the campaign by the Council of Europe, the three Belgian regions and the King Baudouin Foundation.

3 - 4 June 1999 – Strasbourg: the Naturopa Centre organised in Strasbourg, on the occasion of the annual meeting of its National Agencies and in the framework of the campaign, a seminar on the theme “Nature as heritage: from awareness to action”.

11 September 1999 – Henrichenburg (Germany): launch of the "Year of industrial culture 2000 - the German contribution to the European Campaign". The ceremony was part of an information session for journalists on the subject of safeguarding and reusing the Ruhr region's industrial heritage, the intention being to make the Ruhr a region for the promotion of modern technology

7-8 October 1999 – Strasbourg: a European Association of Historic Towns and Regions was formally established at a conference held by the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of Europe (CLRAE).

15-16 October 1999 – Nice (France): 1st international conference on “Tourism and travel heritage”. The conclusions of the conference were presented by the European Foundation for Heritage Skills at the Cultural Heritage Fair in Paris.

4-7 November 1999 – Paris (France): Cultural Heritage Fair. Press conference on the campaign jointly organised by the Council of Europe and the French national committee for the campaign.

February/March 2000 - Santander (Spain): International festival of documentary films on cultural and natural heritage.

10-11 April 2000 – Tarsus (Turkey): International Conference on “the religions at the time of beliefs and tolerance”.

May 2000 – Spain: conference on “Nature, a common European heritage”.

June 2000 – Strasbourg: « Film Festival». It will focus on films where cultural heritage is central. 10 national committees are contributing films: Belarus, Cyprus, France, Italy Lithuania, Portugal, Russian Federation, Romania, Slovak Republic, Turkey. A contract will be signed with the “Cinéma Odysée” to organise the festival, recruit the jury and prepare the screenings/debates. Eurimages will also collaborate in this project.

June 2000 – Edinburgh (United Kingdom): conference on “Tourism and cultural heritage”.

September 2000 – Bern (Switzerland): official launch of European Heritage Days.

September 2000 – Oslo (Norway): international congress on voluntary organisations in the field of heritage.

13 October 2000 – Thessaloniki (Greece): colloquy on the cultural route “Monastic influence” and transfrontier co-operation between Greece, Bulgaria and FYROM, following publication of three cultural-tourist guides as well as the creation of three documentaries on Via Egnatia monasteries, organised by Greece with the participation of the Council of Europe and the European Institute of Cultural Routes. Projection of the documentaries and presentation of the tourist guides to participants, to the public and the media.

20 October 2000 – the Florence Conference, including the ceremony of price award to the winner of the international photography contest.

Autumn 2000 – Tbilissi (Georgia): conference on “Democratic transition, market economy and cultural heritage”.

7-10 December 2000 – Riga (Latvia): closing ceremony of the campaign.

6-7 April 2001 – Portoroz (Slovenia): 5th European Conference of Ministers responsible for Cultural Heritage. This conference will evaluate the results of the campaign and formulate a political declaration defining the action lines for the future.

Transnational projects

29-30 November 1999, Strasbourg: Launch of the "Decorative arts workshops in Europe" project. The following workshops have already agreed to take part in the first meeting : La Granja and Fundacion Real Fabrica de Tapices (Spain), Sèvres (France), Herendt (Hungary), Capodimonte (Italy), Ljubljana (Slovenia), Kütahya Porselen (Turkey). The experts consider it necessary to meet for an editorial project on royal decorative arts workshops in Europe, a subject missing from the current bibliographic panorama. The main goal of the project is to identify a common European area for the decorative arts. The work of an expert and three other meetings are planned for the year 2000.

9-12 December 1999, Alcalá de Henares: Launch of the "Ancient universities route" project. This project is presented at a press conference held at the European Journalists' Association in Madrid on 19 November 1999. The first meeting is attended by vice-chancellors and professors from the universities of Leuven (Belgium), Zagreb (Croatia), Alcalá de Henares (Spain), Tartu (Estonia), Montpellier III (France), Bologne (Italy), Krakow (Poland), Trnava (Slovakia), Istanbul (Turkey) and Oxford (United Kingdom).

17 December 1999: Meeting of the European Association of Historic Towns and Regions (AEVRH) Bureau.

December 1999: Launch of the "Naturopa" magazine 91/1999 issue devoted to the Campaign under the title "Nature: a common heritage of humanity".

13 January 2000, Strasbourg: 2nd meeting of the "Traditional musical heritage in Europe" experts' group.

19-21 January 2000, Strasbourg: The progress of the Campaign is reported to the members of the CDCC at a plenary meeting.

24 January - 12 February 2000, Council of Europe, Committee of Ministers' Foyer: Exhibition of medieval mural paintings of the Gemer (Gömör) district churches (Slovakia), organised by the Permanent Representations of Slovakia and Hungary.

24-25 January 2000, Strasbourg: Launch of the "Religious monuments and sites: towards a culture of religions" project.

25 January 2000, Press Center, Strasbourg: Press conference on the "Religious monuments and sites: towards a culture of religions" project.

25 January 2000, Council of Europe, Strasbourg: Meeting with the NGOs enjoying consultative status with the Council of Europe ("Towns" and "Rural world and environment" groups).

3-4 February 2000, Strasbourg: "Role of heritage in a changing Europe", meeting within the framework of the forward thinking activity steering committee.

7 February 2000, Strasbourg: The CC-PAT Bureau takes note of the state of progress of the Campaign.

16 February 2000: At the 699th meeting of the Ministers’ Deputies, presentation of the Campaign's state of progress.

23 February 2000, Strasbourg: Second meeting of the Presidents or representatives of National Committees or other equivalent working structures in charge of the Campaign under the presidency of Mr Zsolt VISY (Hungary). The Campaign's development at an international level is examined and the activities organised by their National Committees or equivalent working structures are presented.

25 February 2000, Strasbourg: Presentation of the Campaign's state of progress at the CLRAE Standing Commission.

8-10 March 2000, Strasbourg: Presentation of the Campaign's state of progress during the CC-PAT meeting.

13-14 March 2000, Montpellier: 2nd meeting of the "Ancient universities route" project, dedicated to intellectual heritage of universities.

16 March 2000, Strasbourg: Presentation of the Campaign's state of progress at the Culture Rapporteurs Group of the Ministers' Deputies.

5 April 2000, Strasbourg: Presentation of the State of progress of the Campaign to the "Education and Culture" group of the NGOs enjoying consultative status with the Council of Europe.

6-7 April 2000, La Granja : Conference "Perception and protection of landscapes".

7-8 April 2000, Strasbourg: "BALZAC, History of a passion". Cultural activities including a recital, a literary promenade, an exhibition and a conference-debate organised by the Permanent Representations of France, Hungary, Poland, Slovenia a Snd Ukraine to the Council of Europe.

8 May 2000, London: Ceremony organised by the National Trust on the Grand Turk frigate, attended by Mr Chris SMITH, Minister of State for Culture, and Lord RUSSELL JOHNSTON, President of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe.

15-17 May 2000, Dublin: Debate on the report by Mr Takis HADJIDEMETRIOU, Chair of the Subcommittee on cultural heritage, on the Campaign, during the meeting of the Standing Commission of the Parliamentary Assembly.

29-30 May 2000, Sibiu: Restricted thematic meeting of the activity "Functions of heritage in a changing Europe".

20 June 2000, Strasbourg: Meeting of the jury of the "International photography competition <http://culture.coe.fr/postsummit/pat/en/eprojnat06.htm>" project.

23 June 2000, London: Restricted thematic meeting of the activity “Functions of heritage in a changing Europe”.

26-28 June 2000, Bucharest and Sighet: Launch of the "Wooden cultures throughout Europe" project.

21-27 June 2000, Strasbourg: "Cinema and heritage" festival, Odyssée Cinema.

July 2000: Bologna: Third meeting of the "Ancient universities route" project.

2-3 September 2000, Bern: Official launch of the European Heritage Days 2000.

8 September 2000, Strasbourg: 3rd meeting of the "Traditional musical heritage in Europe" project.

14-15 September 2000, Strasbourg: Meeting of the "Industrial Heritage" project.

28-29 September 2000, Safranbolu: 2nd meeting of the "Wooden cultures throughout Europe" project.

5 October 2000: Joint meeting with the Slovenian authorities to prepare the Ministerial Conference.

11-13 October 2000, Berlin: Conference on "Sustainable tourism and employment"

23-24 October 2000, Krakow: 4th meeting of the "Ancient universities route" project.

27-28 October 2000, Luzern: Conference on "Heritage of tourism and travel <http://culture.coe.fr/postsummit/pat/en/eprojnat01.htm>".

21 November 2000: Meeting of the Landscape Award jury.

7-10 December 2000, Riga: Closing ceremony of the Campaign.

9 February 2001 to 3 March 2001, Benaki Museum, Athens (Greece): itinerant exhibition on the theme “Time and days”, organised jointly by the European Institute of Cultural Routes and Benaki Museum (Athens), Hungarian Museums, Pest Department (Museum Tragor Ignac de Vacs, Museum Petofi d’Aszod), Association “Kék Dolmàny” (Hungary), Musée de Bouxwiller (Bas-Rhin, France), Musées du Parc des Vosges du Nord, Théatre du Marché aux Grains, Le grand Jeu, Maison du Kochersberg, (Bas-Rhin, France), Luxembourg Festival of Echternacht and the Private Collection of Christiane Burckell.

24-25 February 2001, Benaki Museum Athens: international scientific colloquy on the theme “Rites, ritual, ritualize”.

6-7 April 2001, Portoroz: 5th European Conference of Ministers responsible for the Cultural Heritage. Theme: "Cultural Heritage and the Challenge of Globalization".

 

Index of Collated Recordings

  1. A group of Irish musicians play "Cavan potholes"

  2. An English ballad: "The banks of Claudy"

  3. "Arco Alpino", the Alps fiddle

  4. A song from Scotland: "Oran Mór Mhic Leoid"

  5. Ball in Auvergne

  6. Ball in Stockholm, led by Jew's harp

  7. Ballad song and dance training - Folkmusikhuset, Stockholm

  8. Bashkir dances

  9. "Belfast Harp Orchestra" in concert

  10. Bingsjöstämman 1997

  11. Biniou and bombarde

  12. Boda spelmanslag - Dans i Nygårds loge 1964 (Boda fiddlers club - Dance in Nygårds barn)

  13. Carnival of Ponte Caffaro

  14. Children's clapping songs

  15. Children's singing games from Moldova

  16. Children's singing games in Sweden

  17. Dance house at Stallet, Stockholm - Anders Nygårds, Fiddle

  18. Dance House Meeting in Budapest

  19. Dance in Fanø Island

  20. Dance music with dance on archival film from Transylvania (Mezőség)

  21. Dance of the Whirling Dervishes

  22. Dance song of the Udmurt minority of Tatarstan

  23. Dancing songs of Poitou

  24. Europe's Iranian musicians

  25. Fado in Portugal

  26. Fest-noz in Brittany

  27. Feast songs in Karpathos

  28. Flamenco in Spain

  29. Halling and Hardingfele

  30. Improvisation on electric kantele - Timo Väänänen

  31. Improvised trio in the festival of Koprivchtitsa

  32. Johan Hedin - Nyckelharpa, Falun Folkmusik Festival 1998

  33. Jojk teaching at Tromsø Music Conservatorium

  34. JPP plays tango at Haapavesi Folk Festiva

  35. "Juhbemérés" (Measuring the milk of sheep): music and dances

  36. "Juhbemérés" (Measuring the milk of sheep): shepherds and musicians

  37. Kantele ensemble - Three members of the Niekku group

  38. Kantele lesson at the Sibelius Academy led by Toivo Alaspää

  39. Karjalan Kalevala runolaulu (Karelian Runic songs) at Taidehalli Klub (Art hall club)

  40. Kulning - Herds woman's calls

  41. Kulning and dance performance - Nobel dinner 1994

  42. Kvaedi - Poetry, song and dance on the Faeroe Islands

  43. "Ländler" in Upper Austria

  44. Lullaby from Tatarstan

  45. Lurlått - Birch-bark trumpet tune

  46. Mandolin solo from the Ural Mountains

  47. Masterclass with students of "Foinn Chonollacha" and Charlie Lennon

  48. Mølledagen (the day of the mills), Fanø

  49. Musical currents of Gascogne

  50. Niall Vallely, musician from Northern Ireland, plays "The roaring water reels"

  51. Old films and concert Wimme Saari - Texas

  52. Old-time music competition with dance - Jutullaget: Polka from Garmo

  53. Pictures from the festival of Koprivchtitsa

  54. Polska in a corridor - Folkmusikhuset, Stockholm

  55. Radamsa at the Haapavesi Folk Festival

  56. Rehearsal - Sofia Karlsson and Harald Haugaard, Stockholm

  57. Ritual of the Kadırı Brotherhoods

  58. Romanian dances from "Calus" Ritual

  59. Røros market - Dans i Sangerhuset

  60. Scenes from a Cretan wedding

  61. Sephardic songs born of Judeo-Arab tradition

  62. Sessions of Irish musicians in pubs

  63. Shaman improvisation - Heikki Laitinen and Kimmo Pohjonen

  64. Singing game in a Dance House in Udmurtia

  65. Solo of Jew's harp from the Ural Mountains

  66. Songs of harvest in the Pays Basque

  67. Songs of Labour from western France

  68. Spoon dance

  69. Stev frå Setesdal

  70.  "Tánctábor": Dance Camp in Transylvania

  71. Teaching Sønderhoning in Fanø Island

  72. The Albanian vocal polyphonies of Malakaster

  73. The bourrée in Morvan

  74. The feast of tambourin

  75. The grand band of pipers

  76. The launeddas of Sardinia

  77. The oboes of the Languedoc

  78. The Welsh group Fernhill sings "Dole Teifi"

  79. Theatre - Hästen och Tranan (The Horse and the Crane)

  80. Tretarante: The pizicca de core

  81. Two accordions - Maija Karhinen and Maria Kalaniemi

  82. "Une anche passe"

  83. Visit to an instrument-maker in Crete

  84. Waltz in the café - Folkmusikhuset, Stockholm

  85. Welcome to Røros market - a polska

  86. A group of Irish musicians play "Cavan potholes"

  87. A song from Scotland: "Oran Mór Mhic Leoid"

  88. An English ballad: "The banks of Claudy"

  89. "Arco Alpino", the Alps fiddle

  90. Ball in Auvergne

  91. Ball in Stockholm, led by Jew's harp

  92. Bashkir dances

  93. "Belfast Harp Orchestra" in concert

  94. Biniou and bombarde

  95. Carnival of Ponte Caffaro

  96. Children's clapping songs

  97. Dance house at Stallet, Stockholm - Anders Nygårds, Fiddle

  98. Dance song of the Udmurt minority of Tatarstan

  99. Dancing songs of Poitou

  100. Epic song from Mezőség (Transylvania)

  101. Europe's Iranian musicians

  102. Fado in Portugal

  103. Fest-noz in Brittany

  104. Feast songs in Karpathos

  105. Flamenco in Spain

  106. Gypsy song

  107. Halling and Hardingfele

  108. Improvisation on electric kantele - Timo Väänänen

  109. Jewish Chanukka song

  110. Kan: Erik Marchand and Albanian singers

  111. Karjalan Kalevala runolaulu (Karelian Runic songs)

  112. at Taidehalli Klub (Art hall club)

  113. Kulning and dance performance - Nobel dinner 1994

  114. "Ländler" in Upper Austria

  115. Lurlått - Birch-bark trumpet tune

  116. Mandolin solo from the Ural Mountains

  117. Masterclass with students of "Foinn Chonollacha" and Charlie

  118. Lennon

  119. Moldovan dance music with tilinkos and kavalos

  120. Moravian instrumental music: melody for two cimballs

  121. Mordvinian summer greeting song

  122. Mordvinian wedding song

  123. Musical currents of Gascogne

  124. Muslim religious Bashkir song

  125. Niall Vallely, musician from Northern Ireland, plays

  126. "The roaring water reels"

  127. Old films and concert Wimme Saari - Texas

  128. Radamsa at the Haapavesi Folk Festival

  129. Ritual rhyme-song for the New Year

  130. Romanian Christmas carol

  131. "Rozenland" by the "Brabants Volksorkest"

  132. Russian song "Zdravstvuj, milaja"

  133. Sephardic songs born of Judeo-Arab tradition

  134. Sessions of Irish musicians in pubs

  135. Shaman improvisation - Heikki Laitinen and Kimmo Pohjonen

  136. Shepherd's tune from Palóc region in Hungary

  137. Singing game in a Dance House in Udmurtia

  138. Solo of Jew's harp from the Ural Mountains

  139. Song from the Rhodopes

  140. Songs of harvest in the Pays Basque

  141. Stev frå Setesdal

  142. Summer greeting from Russia: "Ljeto"

  143. The Albanian vocal polyphonies of Malakaster

  144. The feast of tambourin

  145. The grand band of pipers

  146. The launeddas of Sardinia

  147. The oboes of the Languedoc

  148. The Provencal tambourin

  149. The Welsh group Fernhill sings "Dole Teifi"

  150. Two accordions - Maija Karhinen and Maria Kalaniemi

  151. "Une anche passe"